Beware the 100 deadliest days of summer for teen drivers

Beware the 100 deadliest days of summer for teen drivers

Summer is here, and that brings longer daylight hours and warm weather, and — like clockwork — an increase in traffic fatalities involving teenage drivers.

Dubbed the “100 deadliest days” of the year, the period between Memorial Day and Labor Day has historically been dangerous for the inexperienced and experienced driver alike, although it’s teen drivers who suffer the most losses. This year may even be worse than usual.

Why is this such a dangerous time for teens?

All that sunshine and great weather means there are more vehicles on the road as people attend local events, run more errands or go on trips. Without the cold and snow, there’s less reason to stay indoors and more reason to travel — and more travel means more accidents.

For teen drivers, however, this is also the period where many of them get their first real experience of driving without anybody watching over their shoulders. Now that school is out, many teen drivers are just starting to relish the freedom of having their own transportation. However, they’re also vastly inexperienced when compared to more seasoned drivers.

In addition, teen drivers may be especially prone to mistakes. These can include speeding, failing to wear seatbelts or letting their electronics or friends distract them while they’re driving.

This year may be particularly problematic. Events in 2020 kept a lot of people at home, so last year’s crop of teen drivers is still pretty green. This year, they’re out there learning how to manage road hazards right alongside this year’s new drivers.

What should you do after a crash?

If you were injured in a crash caused by another driver (of any age), you have every right to pursue fair compensation for your injuries and losses. Learning more about the legal steps you need to take during a free consultation can help demystify the process.

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