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How social media can have an impact on divorce

Some Virginia residents use their social media accounts to make short posts or share pictures of their family and friends throughout the day. Some individuals use their social media accounts to make short posts or share pictures of their family and friends throughout the day. Others, however, use it to vent their frustrations. If an individual uses social media while going through a divorce, the posts they share online can be used against them in court.

Whether a person going through a divorce uses email, text or social media, it is usually recommended that they do not discuss what is going on in their case if it has not already been revealed in court. For example, if a person accidentally reveals financial information, such as a new job or an impending bonus, the other party can use this as evidence that the person is not being completely honest about their finances during the divorce trial. LinkedIn, Facebook and even Twitter accounts can be great sources of information for attorneys with both spouses.

Even having an account on a dating site could provide potential evidence that a person was cheating. If a person posts pictures of a party or inebriated celebration when they are supposed to be watching the children or searching for a job, the judge may rule more favorably to the other party.

Couples who are going through a divorce may have difficulty dealing with property division. This can be especially true if the couple has numerous financial and physical assets. If an attorney finds evidence that the other party was hiding assets, they may bring this evidence up in court. Depending on the circumstances, this could lead to a change in spousal support or the division of marital property.

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